About


The World University Championships are organized by the Fédération Internationale du Sport Universitaire (FISU) and are played every two years. The World University Championships (WUCs) were created by the International University Sports Federation (FISU) to complete the program of the Universiade. In 2014, there were 6,448 athletes from 99 countries that competed. Netball is a recognized Olympic sport currently played by 20 million people in over 70 countries around the globe. Netball is a fast game based on the principles of basketball except there is no backboard, no dribbling and the 14 on court players have just 3 seconds to pass the ball.

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Event Statistics

  • 100% female college athletes ages from 17 to 28
  • 11.9 million unique website visits, 33,000 daily visits
  • 1.6 million YouTube views
  • 10,000 global mailing list
  • 10,000 Facebook followers
  • 7,000 twitter followers

“The US International University Sports Federation (USIUSF) is thrilled to be hosting the 2016 FISU World University Netball Championship in 2016 at St. Thomas University.  Netball is a rapidly emerging sport in the United States and we are excited to showcase an international event that will further its national prestige.”

—Stan Brassie, Retired USIUSF Secretary General.
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Read more about the World University Championships here.

 

 

The Netball World University Netball Championship Organizing Committee does not and shall not discriminate on the basis of race, color, religion (creed), gender, gender expression, age, national origin (ancestry), disability, marital status, sexual orientation, or military status, in any of its activities or operations. These activities include, but are not limited to, hiring and firing of staff, selection of volunteers and vendors, and provision of services. We are committed to providing an inclusive and welcoming environment for all members of our staff, clients, volunteers, subcontractors, vendors, and clients. 

 

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